Category Archives: ethnic studies

Trace

Periodically we respond or address issues that surface from our reading. Trace: Memory, History, Race, and the American Landscape is a recently published work by Mount Holyoke earth science professor Lauret Savoy that merits attention. Her writing is lyrical and … Continue reading

Posted in African American History, ancestors, ethnic studies, Native Americans, slavery, Uncategorized | Comments Off on Trace

Birth of a Nation: Another Creation Angle

From time to time those of us working with the Middle Passage Ceremonies and Port Markers Project (MPCPMP) find ourselves re-emphasizing several points about U.S. history as the country addresses the day’s pertinent issues. These themes bear repeating: The nation’s … Continue reading

Posted in American legal system, American politics, descendants of slaves, ethnic studies, gun control, weapons | Comments Off on Birth of a Nation: Another Creation Angle

Second Burial

Among several West African ethnic people, death does not immediately entitle a person the status of ancestor. Traditionally there is a space of time between physical burial, which is quick, and the ceremonial burial that requires an established ritual, after … Continue reading

Posted in African Diaspora, African literature, ancestors, burial ceremonies, descendants of slaves, ethnic studies, Middle Passage, transatlantic slave trade | Comments Off on Second Burial

Florida

As the state with the nation’s longest history of documented African presence, the Project is interested in highlighting Florida’s Middle Passage sites. We intend to honor ancestors and highlight the influence of Africans and their descendants in developing Florida. This … Continue reading

Posted in African American History, African ethnic groups, Afro-Caribbeans, Afro-Latinos, ancestors, captured Africans, descendants of slaves, ethnic studies, Middle Passage, slave ports, slave ships, slavery, transatlantic slave trade | Comments Off on Florida

Separate and Unequal: The Nation’s Story

In the 21st century we are witnessing the unintended consequences of national and local history traditionally presented over centuries from limited points of view. Many of the heroes and sheroes are almost mythological or reflect only partial facts; others, because … Continue reading

Posted in African American History, ethnic studies | Comments Off on Separate and Unequal: The Nation’s Story

Are We Dreamers?

Over the past two weeks the Middle Passage Ceremonies and Port Markers Project has been involved in discussions with communities in Florida to plan remembrance ceremonies for ancestors, in a workshop in southwest Georgia where African Americans were encouraged to … Continue reading

Posted in African American History, ethnic studies | Comments Off on Are We Dreamers?

Transcending Race

Anyone who is able to see the exhibit on race now touring the country should do so. The information is posted in the Upcoming Event section of: www.middlepassageproject.org. Mulling over the videos and interviews of people who participated in the … Continue reading

Posted in African American History, African Diaspora, African ethnic groups, ethnic studies | Comments Off on Transcending Race

The Diggers

Over centuries throughout the Diaspora, the contributions of Africans and their descendants have not been acknowledged or documented. One of the technological wonders of this hemisphere and the world was created by the physical labor of young black men during … Continue reading

Posted in African American History, African Diaspora, Afro-Caribbeans, Afro-Latinos, Central America, descendants of slaves, ethnic studies | Comments Off on The Diggers

The First and the Forced

Over the last two weeks, the issues of law and race surfaced while board members were traveling in the Deep South (Alabama, Georgia, and Mississippi). Previously these states were frontier regions, territories exchanged frequently among European nations, and heavily populated … Continue reading

Posted in African American History, American legal system, ethnic studies, Native Americans | Comments Off on The First and the Forced

Myths of Creation

In the British Virginia Colony during the summer of 1619, two events took place within weeks of each other that would shape the United States of America in profoundly contradictory ways.  One event was the initial legislative assembly of Englishmen … Continue reading

Posted in African American History, African Diaspora, American legal system, American politics, ancestors, descendants of slaves, ethnic studies, Native Americans, Slave economy, slave ports, slavery, transatlantic slave trade | Comments Off on Myths of Creation